DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

It was September 29th when I had just come home from classes and my phone beeps. I got a notification linking me to a New York Times article about students in Mexico who had gone missing after a protest, the police force was implicated. It was a small article no more than half a page long and that is being generous. The next article about the situation came six days later, as I read sentence after sentence I felt a hot rage boil inside of me followed by complete disbelief. “Witnesses said many of them were last seen being carried off by officers,” the article read. That sentence stayed with me as I contemplated how a police force was sworn to protect the people and who work for the people could even think about doing anything like that. Both my parents are Mexican and I identify as Mexican, growing up I would hear my mother telling me wonderful stories about Mexico. She would say it was a wonderful place to live in with open fields and fresh air. As of recently my mother describes Mexico as a mass grave site.

 

Throughout these past four months, I have been following the case, reading every article and looking at different groups both here in the United States and in Mexico that was looking for justice and the safe return of the forty-three missing students. Sadly, as of a couple of days ago Mexican officials had officially announced that the forty-three students of Ayotzinapa were dead. These forty-three students sparked an outrage around the world about the corruption and violence in Mexico, but what many people have not realized is that this was not one isolated event. As of result of this one event, I discovered a blog entitled “#USTired2” that is based here in the United States. This blog revealed so much that is not presented on widely seen media. Mexico has been suffering from an increase in homicides, kidnappings, and drug-related incidents for over a decade due to corruption in the Mexican Government and the funding coming from the United States of America. Yes, that is correct, the United States has been blindly putting money into the hands of possible corrupt officials.

 

Looking from Mexico’s perspective we have another blog entitled “#yamecanse” a widely popularized battle cry that resulted from the missing students of Ayotzinapa. It became the battle cry after Mexican Attorney General Jesus Murillo stated: “ya me canse”(Enough, I am tired) calling a halt to all questions about the 43 missing students. He showed the complete disregard that the rest of the Mexican government has for its people. The blog “#yamecanse” has a video on the front page that brought me to tears when I watched it. We as Mexicans have ignored so much about the reality that we were living but that will not happen anymore. The blog as a whole is aimed to convince people to write to their own government, asking them to stop any treaties with Mexico. These bloggers want to be heard and they want their demands met by their government because their government is supposed to work for them not the other way around.    

 

Both of these blogs ask for the same thing from anyone who is willing to listen, they ask for help. Help to change the way things are currently in Mexico. They feel that their government does not care about them so now they must care for each other and that is not the way I government should be running a country. My fellow Mexicans wake up every day thinking about whether the minute they walk out there door it will be the last thing they do, they fear their own government and their police force, and that is not the way anyone should be living.        

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.