DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

After the disappearance of the forty-three students of Ayotzinapa, many people, all around the world, took to social media websites to voice their outrage and disgust towards the whole incident. The whole movement really obtained its momentum when the phrase "ya me canse" was coined after the Mexican Attorney General, Jesus Murillo, showed complete disregard for the people of Mexico. As a result, two websites have been dedicated to the possible solutions and all the different voices that are involved in this fight. 

 

The first website is based in the United States; it is called #USTired2. The creators of this blog have one mission and that is to unite people in the United States to help convince the American government that a peaceful foreign policy with Mexico would work a lot better than the constantly failing drug war. On their website, they have a page to voice their thought in a blog format, a page dedicated to telling people how they can support the cause, and a fact sheet providing background as to why they are fighting this fight. Most recently, the website has focused on pushing President Obama to halt his support to the President of Mexico, President Enrique Peña Nieto (shown on the right). They have documented protests that ask President Obama to stop sending funds to a government, that on countless occasions, has been noted by the Human Rights Watch, an international advocacy group for human rights, of violating its own peoples' human rights.

 

More recently, the website has focused on President Nieto's visit to Washington D.C. President Nieto intended to meet with President Obama and cabinet members to talk about further economic support from the United States. The website organized a demonstration, through their blog to protest Nieto's visit to the United States in the midst of a crisis in Mexico. In their blog, they use both ethos and pathos to convince their intended audience, which is anyone that is outraged by what is happening in Mexico. They cite the Human Rights Watch Group, an internationally recognized organization, to show that the actions of President Nieto are unforgivable. They represent people's emotion of anger and outrage by using the image to the left. In this image you can see the White House in the background dripping with blood and skulls, symbolizing the amount of deaths that have resulted from United States funding to President Nieto. Then on President Nieto's face, you can see how half of his face looks like that of death because that is all he has brought to Mexico as a president.

 

The second website is based in Mexico; it is called #yamecanse. The goal of this website is similar to that of the other website, only instead of just talking to people in the United States; they are talking to the whole world. This website also documents all the participants of the movement from all around the world. They have a page dedicated to all the tweets, Facebook posts and Instagram posts that include the phrase "#yamecanse." This website, like the other one, has a whole page dedicated to letting everyone know how they can help and support the movement. Unlike the other website, they have a page that explains the movement through a question and answer format. This format gives the reasons as to why Mexico needs reform in the simplest format.

 

The heart of this website can be found on the front page, in the video that is shown below. Through this video, the website aims to convince everyone and anyone to join the movement. It is an extremely convincing video. They use logos by giving facts that all lead-up and explain the idea that change is the need in Mexico. The use of pathos can be found in the gruesome images of all the human rights crimes that have occurred in Mexico, appealing to the audience's anger and sadness. At the beginning of the video, everyone introduces themselves and states that they are Mexican. This lets the audience know that the people in the video know what they are talking about because they experienced it firsthand. Lastly, this video was created right after the Ayotzinapa tragedy. The outrage and anger towards it were fresh in people's mind and with the help of this video, it makes the audience more inclined to join the movement. This video sends an extremely important message and that is a reminder that the government in Mexico is not there to terrorize and destroy their people; it is there to help the people and work for them.         

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.